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  • Please enjoy this install shot of Walter's brilliant Tingari cycle artwork🙂 #aboriginalpainting

182x107cm | $3329 | Free Express Post | Available...
  • Please enjoy this install shot of Walter's brilliant Tingari cycle artwork🙂 #aboriginalpainting 182x107cm | $3329 | Free Express Post | Available on our homepage (bio link) This painting depicts a portion of the Tingari cycle, a very important collection of Dreaming narratives from the Western Desert region. The country that this painting depicts is located far to the west of Yuendumu and spans a vast area of land across the Gibson and Great Sandy Deserts in Western Australia. Aboriginal groups that paint the Tingari cycle include the Pintupi, Kukatja, Ngarti, and Walmajarri peoples, among others. The Tingari cycle consists of three major Dreaming tracks. One begins west of Jupiter Well and eventually runs due east, concluding south-east of Lake Mackay; another heads south-west from near Kintore for some 200 km, and then doubles back to end at Lake Macdonald; the third runs from south to north through Docker River and Kintore. The cycle tells the story of a group of ancient creation ancestors, the Tingari, who travelled across the country. The Tingari took different forms, some human and some animal. Humans were typically initiated men accompanied by ‘punyunyu’ (novices, uninitiated men). The men were sometimes accompanied by extremely powerful initiated women (called variously the ‘Kungka Tjuta,’ ‘Minyma Tjuta,’ or ‘Kanaputa’). Like the initiated men, these initiated women were accompanied by uninitiated women to whom they provided a ritual education. Animals featured in the Tingari cycle include the dingo, emu, kingfisher, and western quoll, among others. As the Tingari travelled over vast areas of the country, they held initiations and other ceremonies, caused or encountered raging bushfires, hunted game, found and cooked bush-tucker, fought and killed one another, disposed of the dead or brought them back to life, interacted with totemic ancestors, copulated illicitly, made and used sacred objects, flew through the air, and died in hailstorms. In the course of these adventures, they either created or became the physical features of the sites they visited, forming rocky outcrops, waterholes, trees, salt lakes, ochre deposits, and so on...
  • 784 12 2 days ago

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  • Please enjoy this beautiful water Dreaming by Sarah Napurrurla Leo🙂 #dotpainting

91x76cm | $1169 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio lin...
  • Please enjoy this beautiful water Dreaming by Sarah Napurrurla Leo🙂 #dotpainting 91x76cm | $1169 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) The site depicted in this painting is Puyurru, west of Yuendumu. In the usually dry creek beds are ‘mulju’ (soakages), or naturally occurring wells. The 'kirda' (owners) for this site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. The storm travelled across the country from the east to the west, initially travelling with a ‘pamapardu Jukurrpa’ (termite Dreaming) from Warntungurru to Warlura, a waterhole 8 miles east of Yuendumu. At Warlura, a gecko called Yumariyumari blew the storm on to Lapurrukurra and Wilpiri. Bolts of lightning shot out at Wirnpa (also called Mardinymardinypa) and at Kanaralji. At this point the Dreaming track also includes the ‘kurdukurdu mangkurdu Jukurrpa’ (children of the clouds Dreaming). The water Dreaming built hills at Ngamangama using baby clouds and also stuck long pointy clouds into the ground at Jukajuka, where they can still be seen today as rock formations. The termite Dreaming eventually continued west to Nyirripi, a community approximately 160 km west of Yuendumu. The water Dreaming then travelled from the south over Mikanji, a watercourse with soakages northwest of Yuendumu. At Mikanji, the storm was picked up by a ‘kirrkarlanji’ (brown falcon [Falco berigora]) and taken farther north. At Puyurru, the falcon dug up a giant ‘warnayarra’ (rainbow serpent). The serpent carried water with it to create another large lake, Jillyiumpa, close to an outstation in this country. The ‘kirda’ (owners) of this story are Jangala men and Nangala women. After stopping at Puyurru, the water Dreaming travelled on through other locations including Yalyarilalku, Mikilyparnta, Katalpi, Lungkardajarra, Jirawarnpa, Kamira, Yurrunjuku, and Jikaya before moving on into Gurindji country to the north.
  • 774 16 yesterday

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  • A work in progress by Margaret Napangardi Lewis🙂 #aboriginalart
  • A work in progress by Margaret Napangardi Lewis🙂 #aboriginalart
  • 3041 81 8:26 AM Sep 19, 2018
  • Who needs a little joy and colour in their life? OK, maybe quite a bit with this beautiful large work by Gwenneth Blitner hanging nearby⚡⚡We recomm...
  • Who needs a little joy and colour in their life? OK, maybe quite a bit with this beautiful large work by Gwenneth Blitner hanging nearby⚡⚡We recommend installing anywhere immediate happiness is needed🙂 120x88cm | $2299 or $229.90 per month with Art Money | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) Bush Flower Country - "It’s pretty on that country. That’s my father’s country, Gilbert Blitner. I been go there with canoe when I was little one, I been go there with my amuri (fathers father). This is spring country; there is a lot of flowers, djupi and fish there; barramundi and turtle. There is an outstation out there. My brother talks for that country. If someone goes there they are lost, but he knows that languas, he knows that country. I can sing for that country, they tell me stop the rain and I sing and stop the rain. My amuri talk that Marra languas and my big brother Glen, that old lady Maureen, my auntie, she taught us that languas. At the bottom of the painting is the grass from the edge of the billabong. Good fishing there. The big one flowers are what those flowers look when your up close." - Gwenneth Blitner
  • 1215 31 7:14 AM Jan 3, 2019

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  • As the two women strained their eyes to see the sky, tears formed in their eyes, creating the rain💦 Their spirits can still be seen at Mikanji in ...
  • As the two women strained their eyes to see the sky, tears formed in their eyes, creating the rain💦 Their spirits can still be seen at Mikanji in the form of two ‘ngapiri’ (river red gums) growing near the soakage. 91x46cm | $559 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) The country associated with this 'ngapa Jukurrpa' (water Dreaming) is Mikanji, a watercourse west of Yuendumu that is usually dry. There are ‘mulju’ (soakages) in this creek bed. The 'kirda' (owners) of this Dreaming site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Mikanji is an important water Dreaming site, and features in at least three different water Dreaming tracks. In one story, the water Dreaming travelled from Puyurru, northwest of Yuendumu, to a ‘mulju’ (soakage) in the Mikanji creek. It unleashed a huge storm there. Two old blind women of the Nampijinpa skin group were sitting by the side of the soakages. As the two women strained their eyes to see the sky, tears formed in their eyes, creating the rain. Their spirits can still be seen at Mikanji in the form of two ‘ngapiri’ (river red gums) growing near the soakage.
  • 577 14 3 days ago
  • Margaret Nangala Gallagher at work on her beautiful Emu Dreaming🙂 #studiolife
  • Margaret Nangala Gallagher at work on her beautiful Emu Dreaming🙂 #studiolife
  • 2151 29 7:24 AM Jan 10, 2019
  • Tina Napangardi Martin💜💜
  • Tina Napangardi Martin💜💜
  • 2022 51 8:33 AM Sep 16, 2018

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  • Please enjoy this beautiful water Dreaming by Sarah Napurrurla Leo🙂 #dotpainting

91x76cm | $1169 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio lin...
  • Please enjoy this beautiful water Dreaming by Sarah Napurrurla Leo🙂 #dotpainting 91x76cm | $1169 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) The site depicted in this painting is Puyurru, west of Yuendumu. In the usually dry creek beds are ‘mulju’ (soakages), or naturally occurring wells. The 'kirda' (owners) for this site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. The storm travelled across the country from the east to the west, initially travelling with a ‘pamapardu Jukurrpa’ (termite Dreaming) from Warntungurru to Warlura, a waterhole 8 miles east of Yuendumu. At Warlura, a gecko called Yumariyumari blew the storm on to Lapurrukurra and Wilpiri. Bolts of lightning shot out at Wirnpa (also called Mardinymardinypa) and at Kanaralji. At this point the Dreaming track also includes the ‘kurdukurdu mangkurdu Jukurrpa’ (children of the clouds Dreaming). The water Dreaming built hills at Ngamangama using baby clouds and also stuck long pointy clouds into the ground at Jukajuka, where they can still be seen today as rock formations. The termite Dreaming eventually continued west to Nyirripi, a community approximately 160 km west of Yuendumu. The water Dreaming then travelled from the south over Mikanji, a watercourse with soakages northwest of Yuendumu. At Mikanji, the storm was picked up by a ‘kirrkarlanji’ (brown falcon [Falco berigora]) and taken farther north. At Puyurru, the falcon dug up a giant ‘warnayarra’ (rainbow serpent). The serpent carried water with it to create another large lake, Jillyiumpa, close to an outstation in this country. The ‘kirda’ (owners) of this story are Jangala men and Nangala women. After stopping at Puyurru, the water Dreaming travelled on through other locations including Yalyarilalku, Mikilyparnta, Katalpi, Lungkardajarra, Jirawarnpa, Kamira, Yurrunjuku, and Jikaya before moving on into Gurindji country to the north.
  • 774 16 yesterday

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  • Please enjoy this install shot of Walter's brilliant Tingari cycle artwork🙂 #aboriginalpainting

182x107cm | $3329 | Free Express Post | Available...
  • Please enjoy this install shot of Walter's brilliant Tingari cycle artwork🙂 #aboriginalpainting 182x107cm | $3329 | Free Express Post | Available on our homepage (bio link) This painting depicts a portion of the Tingari cycle, a very important collection of Dreaming narratives from the Western Desert region. The country that this painting depicts is located far to the west of Yuendumu and spans a vast area of land across the Gibson and Great Sandy Deserts in Western Australia. Aboriginal groups that paint the Tingari cycle include the Pintupi, Kukatja, Ngarti, and Walmajarri peoples, among others. The Tingari cycle consists of three major Dreaming tracks. One begins west of Jupiter Well and eventually runs due east, concluding south-east of Lake Mackay; another heads south-west from near Kintore for some 200 km, and then doubles back to end at Lake Macdonald; the third runs from south to north through Docker River and Kintore. The cycle tells the story of a group of ancient creation ancestors, the Tingari, who travelled across the country. The Tingari took different forms, some human and some animal. Humans were typically initiated men accompanied by ‘punyunyu’ (novices, uninitiated men). The men were sometimes accompanied by extremely powerful initiated women (called variously the ‘Kungka Tjuta,’ ‘Minyma Tjuta,’ or ‘Kanaputa’). Like the initiated men, these initiated women were accompanied by uninitiated women to whom they provided a ritual education. Animals featured in the Tingari cycle include the dingo, emu, kingfisher, and western quoll, among others. As the Tingari travelled over vast areas of the country, they held initiations and other ceremonies, caused or encountered raging bushfires, hunted game, found and cooked bush-tucker, fought and killed one another, disposed of the dead or brought them back to life, interacted with totemic ancestors, copulated illicitly, made and used sacred objects, flew through the air, and died in hailstorms. In the course of these adventures, they either created or became the physical features of the sites they visited, forming rocky outcrops, waterholes, trees, salt lakes, ochre deposits, and so on...
  • 784 12 2 days ago
  • As the two women strained their eyes to see the sky, tears formed in their eyes, creating the rain💦 Their spirits can still be seen at Mikanji in ...
  • As the two women strained their eyes to see the sky, tears formed in their eyes, creating the rain💦 Their spirits can still be seen at Mikanji in the form of two ‘ngapiri’ (river red gums) growing near the soakage. 91x46cm | $559 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) The country associated with this 'ngapa Jukurrpa' (water Dreaming) is Mikanji, a watercourse west of Yuendumu that is usually dry. There are ‘mulju’ (soakages) in this creek bed. The 'kirda' (owners) of this Dreaming site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Mikanji is an important water Dreaming site, and features in at least three different water Dreaming tracks. In one story, the water Dreaming travelled from Puyurru, northwest of Yuendumu, to a ‘mulju’ (soakage) in the Mikanji creek. It unleashed a huge storm there. Two old blind women of the Nampijinpa skin group were sitting by the side of the soakages. As the two women strained their eyes to see the sky, tears formed in their eyes, creating the rain. Their spirits can still be seen at Mikanji in the form of two ‘ngapiri’ (river red gums) growing near the soakage.
  • 577 14 3 days ago
  • Please enjoy the beautiful movement in this new seed Dreaming by Melinda Napurrurla Wilson🙂 #aboriginalart

61x30cm | $259 | Free post | Available...
  • Please enjoy the beautiful movement in this new seed Dreaming by Melinda Napurrurla Wilson🙂 #aboriginalart 61x30cm | $259 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) This Jukurrpa belongs to women of the Nakamarra/Napurrurla subsections and to Jakamarra/Jupurrurla men. This Dreaming is associated with a place called Jaralypari, north of Yuendumu. Lukarrara (desert fringe-rush) is a grass with an edible seed. The seeds are traditionally ground on a large stone (‘ngatinyanu’) with a smaller stone (‘ngalikirri’) to make flour. This flour is mixed with water (‘ngapa’) to make damper cakes which are cooked and eaten. In Warlpiri traditional paintings iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. Large concentric circles often represent the site of Jaralypari and also the seed bearing grass Lukurrara. ‘U’ shapes can depict the Karnta (women) collecting ‘lukarrara’ and straight lines are frequently used to portray seeds that fall down to the ground and are also collected by women using their ‘parrajas’ (wooden food carriers) and ‘karlangu’ (digging sticks).
  • 694 11 4 days ago

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  • everything 2 (interTribal series) in process. Acrylic on wood 24 x 22" 2016-18
  • everything 2 (interTribal series) in process. Acrylic on wood 24 x 22" 2016-18
  • 45 1 4 days ago
  • Margaret Nangala Gallagher at work on her beautiful Emu Dreaming🙂 #studiolife
  • Margaret Nangala Gallagher at work on her beautiful Emu Dreaming🙂 #studiolife
  • 2151 29 7:24 AM Jan 10, 2019
  • Biddy Nungarrayi Long working on some magic today.
  • Biddy Nungarrayi Long working on some magic today.
  • 32 1 3:51 AM Jan 8, 2019
  • 'everything 2' (detail) 20 x 2" acrylic on wood 2017 (interTribal series).
Just did a slight adjustment on this piece. ♥️ it but not ready to revea...
  • 'everything 2' (detail) 20 x 2" acrylic on wood 2017 (interTribal series). Just did a slight adjustment on this piece. ♥️ it but not ready to reveal it just yet (so the original version is currently still up on my site..) Keep a lookout 😉. In the mean time here's a detail shot.
  • 60 4 3:04 AM Jan 7, 2019
  • Who needs a little joy and colour in their life? OK, maybe quite a bit with this beautiful large work by Gwenneth Blitner hanging nearby⚡⚡We recomm...
  • Who needs a little joy and colour in their life? OK, maybe quite a bit with this beautiful large work by Gwenneth Blitner hanging nearby⚡⚡We recommend installing anywhere immediate happiness is needed🙂 120x88cm | $2299 or $229.90 per month with Art Money | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) Bush Flower Country - "It’s pretty on that country. That’s my father’s country, Gilbert Blitner. I been go there with canoe when I was little one, I been go there with my amuri (fathers father). This is spring country; there is a lot of flowers, djupi and fish there; barramundi and turtle. There is an outstation out there. My brother talks for that country. If someone goes there they are lost, but he knows that languas, he knows that country. I can sing for that country, they tell me stop the rain and I sing and stop the rain. My amuri talk that Marra languas and my big brother Glen, that old lady Maureen, my auntie, she taught us that languas. At the bottom of the painting is the grass from the edge of the billabong. Good fishing there. The big one flowers are what those flowers look when your up close." - Gwenneth Blitner
  • 1215 31 7:14 AM Jan 3, 2019
  • Please enjoy the meandering lines of Alice's Tali Tali or Sandhills🙂 #aboriginalart

80x40cm | $519 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio l...
  • Please enjoy the meandering lines of Alice's Tali Tali or Sandhills🙂 #aboriginalart 80x40cm | $519 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) This painting shows the artist's Tjukurrpa, the Tali Tali Dreaming. It refers to the vast and desolate sandhills of her country near Taalalpi, which is located beyond the Kintore/Kiwikurra road near the West Australian and Northern Territory border. This is the country where her father and mother used to travel on foot when she was a young girl. The place is still of great spiritual significance to Alice and her father's family as it contains both, personal and tribal law to which Alice relates in her work. Water has collected in between the sandhills, providing sustenance for her porcupine. The tjikamamta (porcupine) is Alice's own personal tjukurrpa (dreaming). She returned to her country for a visit in late 2005.
  • 752 15 7:55 AM Jan 2, 2019
  • Please enjoy this detail of Margaret's beautiful new dot painting🙏🙂 #dotpainting

107x76cm | $1379 or $137.90 per month with Art Money | Availabl...
  • Please enjoy this detail of Margaret's beautiful new dot painting🙏🙂 #dotpainting 107x76cm | $1379 or $137.90 per month with Art Money | Available on our homepage (bio link) This ‘Jukurrpa’ (Dreaming) comes from Mina Mina, a very important women’s Dreaming site far to the west of Yuendumu near Lake Mackay and the WA border. The ‘kirda’ (owners) of this Dreaming are Napangardi/Napanangka women and Japangardi/Japanangka men; the area is sacred to Napangardi and Napanangka women. There are a number of ‘mulju’ (water soakages) and a ‘maluri’ (clay pan) at Mina Mina. In the Dreamtime, ancestral women danced at Mina Mina and ‘karlangu’ (digging sticks) rose up out of the ground. The women collected the digging sticks and then travelled on to the east, dancing, digging for bush tucker, collecting ‘ngalyipi’ (snake vine), and creating many places as they went. ‘Ngalyipi’ is a rope-like creeper that grows up the trunks and limbs of trees, including ‘kurrkara’ (desert oak). It is used as a ceremonial wrap and as a strap to carry ‘parraja’ (coolamons) and ‘ngami’ (water carriers). ‘Ngalyipi’ is also used to tie around the forehead to cure headaches, and to bind cuts. The women stopped at Karntakurlangu, Janyinki, Parapurnta, Kimayi, and Munyuparntiparnti, sites spanning from the west to the east of Yuendumu. When they stopped, the women dug for bush foods like ‘jintiparnta’ (desert truffle). The Dreaming track eventually took them far beyond Warlpiri country. The track passed through Coniston in Anmatyerre country to the east, and then went on to Alcoota and Aileron far to the northeast of Yuendumu and eventually on into Queensland.
  • 847 9 7:11 AM Dec 30, 2018
  • Please enjoy this beautiful new landscape by Jill Daniels🙂 Here she pictures cattle drinking in South East Arnhem Land.

60x45cm | $489 | Free pos...
  • Please enjoy this beautiful new landscape by Jill Daniels🙂 Here she pictures cattle drinking in South East Arnhem Land. 60x45cm | $489 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) Ngukurr Arts Centre sits a stone’s throw from the banks of the Roper River in South East Arnhem Land. Ngukurr Arts, like the town of Ngukurr itself, is unique – bringing together people of many different clans and language groups. There has never been one distinct school or style associated with Ngukurr Arts but what is typical of the work is boldness – the legacy of artists who have gone before, such as Ginger Riley, Gertie Huddlestone, Sambo Barra Barra and Maureen Thomson. Over time, Ngukurr artists have become renowned for their adventurous styles in interpreting stories and landscapes. Today, artists are supported to explore new techniques. Each artist recontextualises the technique in relation to their own country and culture, to create works that are wholly unique. In this place of many stones, diversity is a strength. Many artists of different influences work alongside each other balancing the old and the new, passing on the stories that link us all.
  • 674 16 7:39 AM Dec 29, 2018
  • Please enjoy Magda's beautiful new Lappi Lappi Dreaming which relates to the home of two rainbow serpents🌈

183x46cm | $1199 | Free post | Availab...
  • Please enjoy Magda's beautiful new Lappi Lappi Dreaming which relates to the home of two rainbow serpents🌈 183x46cm | $1199 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) The subject of this work is Lappi Lappi, a rock hole near Lake Hazlett, about 90 km northwest of Lake Mackay in Western Australia. The country belongs to Nampijinpa/Jampijinpa and Nangala/Jangala skin groups. Located in a sheltered basin, the rock hole at Lappi Lappi is a permanent source of water, and is surrounded by country rich in bush tucker. In the time of the Jukurrpa (Dreamtime) many mothers with young children would gather there because it was a safe place to stay. The rock hole at Lappi Lappi is home to a ‘warnayarra’, a rainbow serpent that travels underground between various rock holes. One day, women were gathered at the rock hole with their children, singing and dancing. When the ‘warnayarra’ heard the sound of voices, it travelled silently towards them, under the water. When it reached the edge of the rock hole, it rose out of the water and ate them all.
  • 382 7 7:45 AM Dec 27, 2018
  • Please enjoy this beautiful new work by Pauline Nampijinpa Singleton🙂

Here she shares her Yankirri Jukurrpa (emu Dreaming). 91x91cm | $1159 | Fre...
  • Please enjoy this beautiful new work by Pauline Nampijinpa Singleton🙂 Here she shares her Yankirri Jukurrpa (emu Dreaming). 91x91cm | $1159 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) This particular site of the Yankirri Jukurrpa, (emu Dreaming) is at Ngarlikurlangu, north of Yuendumu. The ‘yankirri’ travelled to the rockhole at Ngarlikurlangu to find water. This Jukurrpa story belongs to Jangala/Jampijinpa men and Nangala/Nampijinpa women. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, associated sites and other elements. Emus are usually represented by their ‘wirliya’ (footprints), arrow-like shapes that show them walking around Ngarlikurlangu eating ‘yakajirri’ (bush raisin). In the time of the Jukurrpa there was a fight at Ngarlikiurlangu between a ‘yankirri’ ancestor and Wardilyka (Australian bustard) ancestors over sharing the ‘yakajirri’. There is also a dance for this Jukurrpa that is performed during initiation ceremonies.
  • 811 19 7:37 AM Dec 23, 2018
  • Christmas is upon us and we have gift cards available, if needed🙂 This beautiful new Emu Dreaming is by Lee Nangala Gallagher and has just hit our...
  • Christmas is upon us and we have gift cards available, if needed🙂 This beautiful new Emu Dreaming is by Lee Nangala Gallagher and has just hit our homepage (bio link) Have an awesome weekend💥
  • 1054 27 7:05 AM Dec 21, 2018
  • indigenous Australian art found at GoMA in Brisbane
  • indigenous Australian art found at GoMA in Brisbane
  • 19 2 2:00 AM Dec 21, 2018
  • Please enjoy this beautiful new painting by Alice Nampijinpa Michaels🙂 Here she shares her Lappi Lappi Dreaming⚡

76x76cm | $819 | Free express po...
  • Please enjoy this beautiful new painting by Alice Nampijinpa Michaels🙂 Here she shares her Lappi Lappi Dreaming⚡ 76x76cm | $819 | Free express post | Available on our homepage (bio link) Alice Nampijinpa Michaels was born at Mt Doreen station, a cattle station about 55km west of Yuendumu, in the Northern Territory. While her father worked as a stockman on the cattle station, she and her family would hunt and gather food in the surrounding area. Occasionally, when they came across traditional Aboriginal people, Alice and her family would bring them a delivery of food, blankets and clothes. In 1946, the federal government established Yuendumu community to deliver rations and welfare services to the Aboriginal people who had been working with the Labour Corps in Alice Springs during WWII. In 1947 a Baptist mission was established there, and in the decade that followed Aboriginal people of various tribes and families from the surrounding area were forcibly relocated to Yuendumu. Alice still remembers the cattle truck that came to Mt Doreen to collect her family and many others when she was a young girl of about ten. Alice spent the remainder of her childhood at Yuendumu, attending the missionary’s school. When she was a young woman, she married her promised husband, a man significantly older than herself. To overcome her initial shyness in his company, they moved away together to Haasts Bluff, another community some 130km away, where Alice had no family. When they returned to Yuendumu, she brought back her first child, Kelly Napanagka Michaels, who also paints for Warlukurlangu Artists and lives in Yuendumu. Alice began working at Yuendumu council, but did not stay long as she quickly had a further three children. Alice now has a big mob of grandchildren. With the advent of the Northern Territory Land Rights Act in 1976, many Indigenous people who had been forced to live in communities such as Yuendumu began to move back onto their traditional lands. In 1983, Alice and her young family moved to Nyirripi, a community 160km southwest of Yuendumu, along with two other families that she had lived with at Mt Doreen. She has lived both at Nyirripi and Emu Bore...
  • 504 8 6:51 AM Dec 18, 2018
  • Charmaine Napurrurla Brown working on something special in the studio today.
  • Charmaine Napurrurla Brown working on something special in the studio today.
  • 43 2 5:18 AM Dec 17, 2018
  • Please consider giving a beautiful 'forever gift' these holidays and support an artist🙏🎁 A detail of Alice's beautiful Lappi Lappi Dreaming 😊
  • Please consider giving a beautiful 'forever gift' these holidays and support an artist🙏🎁 A detail of Alice's beautiful Lappi Lappi Dreaming 😊
  • 855 8 7:47 AM Dec 9, 2018
  • Please enjoy Selina's beautiful new water Dreaming💦

122x61cm | $1039 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link)

The site depicted in thi...
  • Please enjoy Selina's beautiful new water Dreaming💦 122x61cm | $1039 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) The site depicted in this painting is Puyurru, west of Yuendumu. In the usually dry creek beds are ‘mulju’ (soakages), or naturally occurring wells. The 'kirda' (owners) for this site are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. Two Jangala men, rainmakers, sang the rain, unleashing a giant storm. The storm travelled across the country from the east to the west, initially travelling with a ‘pamapardu Jukurrpa’ (termite Dreaming) from Warntungurru to Warlura, a waterhole 8 miles east of Yuendumu. At Warlura, a gecko called Yumariyumari blew the storm on to Lapurrukurra and Wilpiri. Bolts of lightning shot out at Wirnpa (also called Mardinymardinypa) and at Kanaralji. At this point the Dreaming track also includes the ‘kurdukurdu mangkurdu Jukurrpa’ (children of the clouds Dreaming). The water Dreaming built hills at Ngamangama using baby clouds and also stuck long pointy clouds into the ground at Jukajuka, where they can still be seen today as rock formations.
  • 694 12 8:00 AM Dec 8, 2018
  • Rearranging a gorgeous @sarritaking painting to a new location. Ok so you can't see how magnificent the painting is 😂 but you can always spot a Sa...
  • Rearranging a gorgeous @sarritaking painting to a new location. Ok so you can't see how magnificent the painting is 😂 but you can always spot a Sarrita King artwork by the pink handprint on the back of the linen! This unique signature is such a creative and interesting way to identify her work (and the work of her sister @tarisse_king, who uses a blue handprint!) 🎨🌴
  • 59 1 10:10 AM Dec 4, 2018
  • Please enjoy this beautiful painting by Albury Jangala Dixon⚡ #aboriginalart

61x61cm | $519 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link)

Th...
  • Please enjoy this beautiful painting by Albury Jangala Dixon⚡ #aboriginalart 61x61cm | $519 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) The Tingari cycle consists of three major Dreaming tracks. One begins west of Jupiter Well and eventually runs due east, concluding south-east of Lake Mackay; another heads south-west from near Kintore for some 200 km, and then doubles back to end at Lake Macdonald; the third runs from south to north through Docker River and Kintore. The cycle tells the story of a group of ancient creation ancestors, the Tingari, who travelled across the country. The Tingari took different forms, some human and some animal. Humans were typically initiated men accompanied by ‘punyunyu’ (novices, uninitiated men). The men were sometimes accompanied by extremely powerful initiated women (called variously the ‘Kungka Tjuta,’ ‘Minyma Tjuta,’ or ‘Kanaputa’). Like the initiated men, these initiated women were accompanied by uninitiated women to whom they provided a ritual education. Animals featured in the Tingari cycle include the dingo, emu, kingfisher, and western quoll, among others. As the Tingari travelled over vast areas of the country, they held initiations and other ceremonies, caused or encountered raging bushfires, hunted game, found and cooked bush-tucker, fought and killed one another, disposed of the dead or brought them back to life, interacted with totemic ancestors, copulated illicitly, made and used sacred objects, flew through the air, and died in hailstorms. In the course of these adventures, they either created or became the physical features of the sites they visited, forming rocky outcrops, waterholes, trees, salt lakes, ochre deposits, and so on. These sites which are now regarded as sacred by their descendants, today’s custodians of these places. The Tingari also laid down social custom and law as it should be practised today. Their journeys form the basis of sacred and secret men’s and women’s laws. Public paintings of the Tingari cycle typically only show the unrestricted portions of these stories.
  • 957 11 7:28 AM Dec 4, 2018
  • Please enjoy this beautiful design and dreaming by Virginia Napanangka Ngalaia🙂 #australiandesign

163x45cm | $1039 | Free post | Available on our...
  • Please enjoy this beautiful design and dreaming by Virginia Napanangka Ngalaia🙂 #australiandesign 163x45cm | $1039 | Free post | Available on our homepage (bio link) This painting depicts the story of Kushinia, an ancestral woman. Kushinia knew how to make people's hair really shiny and beautiful. This painting shows the shiny hair of Kushinia.
  • 567 12 7:36 AM Dec 1, 2018
  • Please enjoy this beautiful new work by Gloria Napangardi Gill😊 Here she shares her Lukarra Jukurrpa or desert fringe-rush Dreaming⚡

107x91cm | $...
  • Please enjoy this beautiful new work by Gloria Napangardi Gill😊 Here she shares her Lukarra Jukurrpa or desert fringe-rush Dreaming⚡ 107x91cm | $1369 | Free post | Available one our homepage bio link) This Jukurrpa belongs to women of the Nakamarra/Napurrurla subsections and to Jakamarra/Jupurrurla men. This Dreaming is associated with a place called Jaralypari, north of Yuendumu. Lukarrara (desert fringe-rush) is a grass with an edible seed. The seeds are traditionally ground on a large stone (‘ngatinyanu’) with a smaller stone (‘ngalikirri’) to make flour. This flour is mixed with water (‘ngapa’) to make damper cakes which are cooked and eaten. In Warlpiri traditional paintings iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. Large concentric circles often represent the site of Jaralypari and also the seed bearing grass Lukurrara. ‘U’ shapes can depict the Karnta (women) collecting ‘lukarrara’ and straight lines are frequently used to portray seeds that fall down to the ground and are also collected by women using their ‘parrajas’ (wooden food carriers) and ‘karlangu’ (digging sticks).
  • 1099 18 8:00 AM Nov 29, 2018